Oregon Backstage; a fundraiser for OMHOF feat. Portugal. The Man, Pete Krebs w/special guest Ural Thomas

Oregon Backstage; a fundraiser for OMHOF feat. Portugal. The Man, Pete Krebs w/special guest Ural Thomas

Sat, May 6, 2017

Doors: 6:00 pm / Show: 6:00 pm

$85 advance • $100 at the door • Age 16 and under $25 (limited number available)

Oregon Backstage - (Set time: 6:00 PM)
Oregon Backstage
Oregon Backstage; an evening of mingling and music benefiting the Oregon Music Hall of Fame Saturday, May 6 at 6pm at The Secret Society in Portland, OR.

The Oregon Music Hall of Fame presents its new fundraising concert and auction event – Oregon Backstage - an evening of mingling and music benefiting the Oregon Music Hall of Fame, on Saturday, May 6, 6pm at The Secret Society in NE Portland. The event features intimate performances by beloved musicians together in this one night event. Musical performances by Portugal. The Man, Ural Thomas and Pete Krebs highlight the
evening. Between performances, attendees can bid on
music experience packages during a silent auction and live
guitar auction, all while guests mingle among Oregon
musicians and industry legends. The evening ends with a
musician jam session lead by Ural Thomas.
Funds raised during the event support the Oregon Music
Hall of Fame (OMHOF) and its scholarship and music
education programs. The first-annual event will be held at
the exclusive The Secret Society, setting the tone for an
evening of intimate music and surprise performances . This
event is open to all ages, and tickets are limited. Tickets are
$85 in advance and $100 at the door with a limited number of $25 tickets for kids aged 16 or younger.

Portugal. The Man, 2014 Oregon Music Hall of Fame Artist of the Year, will perform a not-to-miss, exclusive acoustic set at this first-time event. The band’s new ablum Woodstock comes out soon and includes their new single “Feel It Still”. Portugal. The Man’s last album came out over three years ago. This is an anticipated, rare live performance.

Oregon Backstage welcomes Ural Thomas who will perform their infamous rhythm and blues set and lead a closing jam session with invited musicians. Thomas is a Portland-based R&B singer, songwriter and musician known as "Portland's Pillar of Soul". Thomas was a singer on the rise in the 1960s, releasing singles and playing shows with Otis Redding and the Rolling Stones. He walked away from the music business and returned to his hometown of Portland where he still resides.

Pete Krebs, an Oregon Music Hall of Fame inductee, kicks off the evening’s performances. Pete Krebs has been a fixture on the Portland music scene since 1987. His musical pursuits have spanned several decades and genres, including punk rock, Western swing, old-time, jazz and folk. His bands have included Thrillhammer, Hazel, Golden Delicious, Pete Krebs and The Gossamer Wings, The Stolen Sweets and Pete Krebs and His Portland Playboys. He's shared the stage with a broad range of world-class musicians including Nirvana, Elliott Smith, Peter Rowan and The Hot Club of Cowtown.
Portugal. The Man
Portugal. The Man
It was last spring 2012, and John Gourley—frontman of Portugal. The Man—found himself in New York City about to ring the bell at Danger Mouse’s apartment--a long way from his current home in Portland, and farther still from his real home in Alaska. Six full-length albums in six years, nonstop touring, a stint with The Black Keys and festival stops at Coachella, Bonnaroo and Lollapalooza—up until this moment, Portugal. The Man embodied all dimensions of DIY rock range.

When it came time to begin work on the seventh album, Gourley thought long and hard about the next move and kept coming back to one concept: The most satisfying work is collaborative work. From building houses with his father in Alaska to building a devoted fanbase, he had sought partnerships. So he took a bold step — bold for a proven band, bolder still for its uncertainty of sound — a step up to the apartment of a possible collaborator, Danger Mouse.

“I walked into his place,” Gourley remembers now. “And it wasn’t going to happen. He was like, ‘Hey, man, just so you know, I don’t really want to record a rock band.’ And I was a little relieved. We’d done this by ourselves before, and we knew we could do it by ourselves again.”

But then they got to listening, and to talking about how much Danger Mouse had loved In the Mountain in the Cloud — the 2011 followup to Portugal. The Man’s break out record The Satanic Satanist. “From that very first meeting,” says Danger Mouse, “we were very ambitious about what we could do…otherwise there was no point. So we decided: Let’s try and make something really special.”

So Danger Mouse — aka Brian Burton, the five-time Grammy award winning producer behind everything from Gnarls Barkley and Beck to The Black Keys and now U2 —and the band agreed that they were game for the challenge and began production on what would become Evil Friends, the undaunted re-awakening for Portugal. The Man. As much as their collaborative imaginations melded, to construct songs that lived up to the ambitious visions they had would take some time. After all, here was a band with an evolving lineup — Kyle O’Quin on keyboards, Noah Gersh on guitar/percussion/keyboards, and Kane Ritchotte on drums joined Zach Carothers on bass and vocals and Gourley on lead vocals and guitar — building new songs with a new producer trying to do something neither of them had done before.

They went, together, to Los Angeles and worked through several sessions — at Mondo Studios, Eltro Vox Studios, and Kingsize Soundlabs. The band worked months longer than they ever had on one thing. And somehow — maybe it was the collaboration in the air, or maybe sheer will — they finally stopped searching and started realizing: “What really brought our record together was getting past that period of looking for something, and figuring out how to do something really new, really hard, and really satisfying,” said Gourley.

Each track on Evil Friends is as different from the next as Portugal. The Man’s previous records were from each other, which is to say a piece of a growing mindscape, and wholly a part of the group’s tumbling fever dream. Where the 2009 hit “People Say” was a cheery guitar rally, the new title track is a bells-and-balls ballad emerging from darkness into a pipe-whistling punky thump, albeit with Gourley’s trademark falsetto and thundering guitar. And yet here is Evil Friends swirling, like a tornado that sends a napping child toward Oz, into something of a tale of Portugal. The Man’s arousal from when it decided to make something special to when it actually did: The weighted down questions of “Plastic Soldiers” (Could it be we got lost in the summer? / Well I know you know that it’s over) give way to the confident melodies of “Modern Jesus” (The only rule we need is never giving up / The only faith we have is faith in us) and finally, brazenly, to the anthem “Smile” (We watched the sun come up / But took it down to hide it / Seems like the spring has come and gone / It felt like forever).

It took all year, and Portugal. The Man — a group guaranteed for seven years to pump out a record, to tour and tour and tour, to tuck its fans to bed at night with a community of psychedelic rock — had learned to slow down and transform all-day, all-night recording with Danger Mouse into adrenaline, into words that are at once dark and light, into sounds that are overlapping with danger and charm. The whole “evil friends” thing was just a happy writing accident, by the way, a lyrical coincidence belying a collaborative friendship Burton says taught him, too: “I felt like I was watching them do something special and I wanted to let them do it, so sometimes I was more hands-on, but sometimes more hands-off than I had been with anyone,” says Danger Mouse. “They had done enough albums that I thought it would be fun to shake it up a little bit.”

“In the beginning, I asked Brian why he had wanted to talk about making a record,” recalls Gourley. “And he admitted that he was surprised when he saw us live. ‘I didn’t know you guys could sound like that.’ There had been this perception that we’ve been something else — and I’ve noticed it, at festivals, everywhere — that we were something we were not. But then we got in a room with Danger Mouse, to the place where we could just throw that out, wake up and say, Here we are. We’re this band! Let’s just make it, together.”
Pete Krebs
Pete Krebs
Originally from Southern California, Pete Krebs has been a fixture on the Portland music scene since 1987. His musical pursuits have spanned several decades and genres, including punk rock, Western swing, old-time, jazz and folk. His bands have included Thrillhammer, Hazel, Golden Delicious, Pete Krebs and The Gossamer Wings, The Stolen Sweets and Pete Krebs and His Portland Playboys.



He's shared the stage with a broad range of world-class musicians including Nirvana, Elliott Smith, Peter Rowan and The Hot Club of Cowtown. He's performed at venues and festivals large and small, legendary and infamous, including CBGBs, Preservation Hall, Pickathon and Lollapalooza. He's received mostly good press from the likes of Rolling Stone, Spin, Magnet and No Depression. His commercial work has been featured nationally for NASCAR and the NFL as well as for the Oregon Lottery.


An in-demand performer, collaborator, composer and teacher, he is currently working on a number of projects and releases for late 2016 and 2017, including the release of a live Hazel performance from 1993, a “best of” record, and an album of new original work. A film about his life is also in the works. He is a double inductee in the Oregon Music Hall of Fame and a double cancer survivor. He lives in NE Portland with his partner in crime Kelley and their two dogs, Merle and Dixie. He's pretty stoked about the whole thing.
Ural Thomas
Ural Thomas
Ural Thomas is, and forever will be Portland's pillar of soul.
He started singing beneath his mother’s knee in church at the age of 3. By high school he led the doo-wop group the Mono Rays, breaking hearts and taking names at Jefferson High and Irvington Park along the way. Ural's voice and songwriting soon gained national attention and he found himself sharing the stage with the likes of James Brown, Otis Redding, Johnny Guitar Watson and "Little" Stevie Wonder. He played the Apollo 44 times. He backed the Northwest's biggest soul and garage outfits of the1960s (The Kingsmen, Paul Revere and the Raiders, Cavaliers Unlimited) and he never for a moment stopped teaching, singing and loving soul music..

Now Ural is poised to represent Portland on equal ground with contemporaries like Lee Fields, Sharon Jones and Charles Bradley, all of whom ultimately gained their dues in their golden years. To ensure the legacy he's backed by a 9 piece band comprised of the some of the most recognizable session and solo players in town. Band leader/drummer Scott Magee (aka DJ Cooky Parker) has arranged a setlist compiled from the gilded age of soul and R&B and Ural originals, all with a sharp focus on moving the dance floor. The foot stomping days of Jump Town, USA have returned and Ural Thomas & the Pain are here to lead the way.
Venue Information:
The Secret Society
116 NE Russell
Portland, OR, 97212
http://secretsociety.net/